The Crusader Sword (#1303)

5.00 out of 5

The first crusade took place between 1096 and 1099. Led by the Roman Catholic church, under Pope Urban II, as a military expedition. The goal was to regain the holy lands lost to Muslims in the conquest of Levant (632-661 A.D.). (read more…)

Blade: 5160 High Carbon Steel
Dual Tempered HRc 60 48-50 at the core
Guard and Pommel: Mild Steel
Overall Length: 34.5 inches
Blade Length: 27.5 inches
Blade Width at Guard: 2.2 inches
Grip Length: 4 1/2 inches
Pommel: Peened
Blade Sharpness: Sharp
Thickness: 5.3mm – 1.3mm
Weight: 2 lbs. 5 oz.
POB: 4 inches

$425.00$545.00 USD

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one-handed-crusader-medieval-sword-1303-medieval-weapon-darksword-armory
 
 

The First Crusade took place between 1096 and 1099. Led by the Roman Catholic church, under Pope Urban II, as a military expedition. The goal was to regain the holy lands lost to Muslims in the conquest of Levant (632-661 A.D.). The crusades started when Christians’ access to Jerusalem was cut off by the Seljuk Turks after the defeat of the Byzantine army. What followed were a series of crusades that ran for nearly two centuries (1096-1272). The last being led by Edward I. With the influence of the Catholic church, all men at arms were bound to use the cruciform sword, with its symbolic cross section, forever historically tied to the imagery of the Crusading Knights. The cruciform guard was imposed by the church to remind all soldiers of their Christian religion and the ‘greater’ purpose of the war. Ultimately the crusades led to the mass slaughter, rape and devastation on both sides.

The Crusader sword, like many of its historical counterparts, is regarded as the quintessential sword of the crusading knight. Richly ceremonial due to its symbolic shape, the Cruciform swords of the Crusading period were designed with proportions of perfection of form and harmony. Some sources speak of “divine proportions”; a complex geometry which flowed to represent the harmony of nature. The formula of these ‘proportions’ were used to create ‘golden triangles’ and ‘golden rectangles’ which were commonly applied to architectural designs. In ‘The Noble art of the Sword’, Tobia Capwell wrote that the use of the ‘divine proportions’ led to the belief and acceptance that swords could have artistic merit beyond the notion of ‘practicality’. Classically styled, the Crusader sword was designed with the ‘proportions’ in mind. The simple yet elegant sword, topped with the circular wheel pommel, was carefully fitted to a blade offering exceptional reflex, balance and control. The sword is responsive, quick, resilient yet flexible. The sword has a sharply tapered cut and thrust blade. When in hand, the sensation, is that of an extension of ones arm. Although minimalist, the crusader sword is of stunning complexity. The Crusader sword is made from 5160 High Carbon steel. Peened pommel and mild steel fittings. The wood handle is wrapped in high quality distressed cognac brown leather and stitched at the side.

 

 

 

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Darksword Armory
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5 reviews for The Crusader Sword (#1303)


  1. 5 out of 5
    Rated 5 out of 5

    :

    I just received the sword this afternoon and want to thank you. The quality exceeded my expectations. I look forward to doing business with you in the future. Thanks – Chris D., Michigan, U.S.A.

    I just received the sword this afternoon and want to thank you. The quality exceeded my expectations. I look forward to doing business with you in the future. Thanks – Chris D., Michigan, U.S.A.

  2. 5 out of 5
    Rated 5 out of 5

    :

    Just received the sword today. I’m at a loss for words, it is truly magnificent, the workmanship is first class, it’s beauty and balance sings in your hands. The smell and the weight commands respect, this is a most respected piece of work. Please thank all the artisans that worked on this, their work is very appreciated, thank you for keeping this part of history and skill alive. I now must order the matching dagger very soon. thank you again – john., Hope, B.C. Canada

    Just received the sword today. I’m at a loss for words, it is truly magnificent, the workmanship is first class, it’s beauty and balance sings in your hands. The smell and the weight commands respect, this is a most respected piece of work. Please thank all the artisans that worked on this, their work is very appreciated, thank you for keeping this part of history and skill alive. I now must order the matching dagger very soon. thank you again – john., Hope, B.C. Canada

  3. 5 out of 5
    Rated 5 out of 5

    :

    It is such a tremendous relief to know that my countless hours of research did in fact lead me to finally choose the right swordsmiths! Darksword Armory are everything I’d hoped they would be. I have purchased quite a few ancient and medieval weapons over the last few decades. But the only truly “battle ready” sword I owned was an extravagant gift from a dear friend who payed a great deal of money for a magnificent Katana. Frankly, I’d begun to accept the apparent fact that people who do not have “real” money, cannot hope to own real swords. But I am very pleased to say that Darksword Armory has demonstrated that this is absolutely NOT the case! My new Sword, and Dagger are everything I’d hoped for… and more! They are beautifully crafted weapons… with excellent balance, strength, and flexibility. They are also “finished” to a degree which i have not seen in any of the similarly priced blades i have examined. I got so excited when i first held the Sword that i admit to going a little overboard testing the blade’s flexibility and hardness/sharpness lol! I’m pleased as hell to report that no damage occured. DSA is not kidding when they characterize a sword as Battle Ready! Thank you, Darksword Armory! – J. Lavette, Canada

    It is such a tremendous relief to know that my countless hours of research did in fact lead me to finally choose the right swordsmiths! Darksword Armory are everything I’d hoped they would be. I have purchased quite a few ancient and medieval weapons over the last few decades. But the only truly “battle ready” sword I owned was an extravagant gift from a dear friend who payed a great deal of money for a magnificent Katana. Frankly, I’d begun to accept the apparent fact that people who do not have “real” money, cannot hope to own real swords. But I am very pleased to say that Darksword Armory has demonstrated that this is absolutely NOT the case! My new Sword, and Dagger are everything I’d hoped for… and more! They are beautifully crafted weapons… with excellent balance, strength, and flexibility. They are also “finished” to a degree which i have not seen in any of the similarly priced blades i have examined. I got so excited when i first held the Sword that i admit to going a little overboard testing the blade’s flexibility and hardness/sharpness lol! I’m pleased as hell to report that no damage occured. DSA is not kidding when they characterize a sword as Battle Ready! Thank you, Darksword Armory! – J. Lavette, Canada

  4. 5 out of 5
    Rated 5 out of 5

    :

    first impression was how light DSA’s Crusader sword (1303) is on unboxing. far lighter than either their Excalibur or windlass’s Accolade. the belted scabbard is nice and simple, but longer than the blade. no real need for anything elaborate, altho an embossed crusader cross might’ve been nice. the sword itself is as I had hoped. hate to disappoint some of you, actually I don’t , but the pommel and grip didn’t slide off while pulling off the last remnants of plastic wrap. and why so much of that, anyway . the peen is a bit on the small side, but nicely done, and I think is a tapered tang to a rounded end. the leather wrapped grip with 5 risers, 3 in middle, is also nice and fits well enuff in my hand. fit of blade in scabbard isn’t stiff, but it still loose enuff to slide out on it’s own at the right angle. there are no gaps between either of the pommel or crossguard and the grip. the guard itself is kinda long and tapers well to rounded/blunt tips which could be sharpened, should one desire so. there’s a slight gap, and what sword doesn’t have one, between the guard and where the blade inserts, but it’s not at all significant. there is a distal taper but it’s barely noticeable. the blade comes to a very nice point. the fuller doesn’t appear to be off center at all along almost the entire length, ending about 3-4in from the tip. CoB is about 4-5in from the guard, CoP 6-7in from the tip, maybe a bit more. the sword as a whole doesn’t feel blade heavy at all, and rather well balanced. as for how it looks, very nice and what one would expect a crusader to wield so long ago. gotta say I’m happy with it, and while this is but one example, I think certain issues concerning DSA must needs be put to rest once and for all.

    first impression was how light DSA’s Crusader sword (1303) is on unboxing. far lighter than either their Excalibur or windlass’s Accolade. the belted scabbard is nice and simple, but longer than the blade. no real need for anything elaborate, altho an embossed crusader cross might’ve been nice. the sword itself is as I had hoped. hate to disappoint some of you, actually I don’t , but the pommel and grip didn’t slide off while pulling off the last remnants of plastic wrap. and why so much of that, anyway . the peen is a bit on the small side, but nicely done, and I think is a tapered tang to a rounded end. the leather wrapped grip with 5 risers, 3 in middle, is also nice and fits well enuff in my hand. fit of blade in scabbard isn’t stiff, but it still loose enuff to slide out on it’s own at the right angle. there are no gaps between either of the pommel or crossguard and the grip. the guard itself is kinda long and tapers well to rounded/blunt tips which could be sharpened, should one desire so. there’s a slight gap, and what sword doesn’t have one, between the guard and where the blade inserts, but it’s not at all significant. there is a distal taper but it’s barely noticeable. the blade comes to a very nice point. the fuller doesn’t appear to be off center at all along almost the entire length, ending about 3-4in from the tip. CoB is about 4-5in from the guard, CoP 6-7in from the tip, maybe a bit more. the sword as a whole doesn’t feel blade heavy at all, and rather well balanced. as for how it looks, very nice and what one would expect a crusader to wield so long ago. gotta say I’m happy with it, and while this is but one example, I think certain issues concerning DSA must needs be put to rest once and for all.

  5. 5 out of 5
    Rated 5 out of 5

    (verified owner):

    Great piece of craftsmanship, art and history! Very satisfied with my recent purchase from DSA, a welcome addition to the collection. TIGHT fittings, clean finish. Scabbard is clean well made. Nice and sharp (this is not a katana) Nice balance in motion,Solid sword for anyone starting or adding to a collection.

    Great piece of craftsmanship, art and history! Very satisfied with my recent purchase from DSA, a welcome addition to the collection. TIGHT fittings, clean finish. Scabbard is clean well made. Nice and sharp (this is not a katana) Nice balance in motion,Solid sword for anyone starting or adding to a collection.

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The First Crusade took place between 1096 and 1099.

Led by the Roman Catholic church, under Pope Urban II, as a military expedition. The goal was to regain the holy lands lost to Muslims in the conquest of Levant (632-661 A.D.). The crusades started when Christians' access to Jerusalem was cut off by the Seljuk Turks after the defeat of the Byzantine army. What followed were a series of crusades that ran for nearly two centuries (1096-1272). The last being led by Edward I. With the influence of the Catholic church, all men at arms were bound to use the cruciform sword, with its symbolic cross section, forever historically tied to the imagery of the Crusading Knights. The cruciform guard was imposed by the church to remind all soldiers of their Christian religion and the 'greater' purpose of the war. Ultimately the crusades led to the mass slaughter, rape and devastation on both sides.

The Crusader sword, like many of its historical counterparts, is regarded as the quintessential sword of the crusading knight. Richly ceremonial due to its symbolic shape, the Cruciform swords of the Crusading period were designed with proportions of perfection of form and harmony. Some sources speak of "divine proportions"; a complex geometry which flowed to represent the harmony of nature. The formula of these 'proportions' were used to create 'golden triangles' and 'golden rectangles' which were commonly applied to architectural designs. In 'The Noble art of the Sword', Tobia Capwell wrote that the use of the 'divine proportions' led to the belief and acceptance that swords could have artistic merit beyond the notion of 'practicality'. Classically styled, the Crusader sword was designed with the 'proportions' in mind. The simple yet elegant sword, topped with the circular wheel pommel, was carefully fitted to a blade offering exceptional reflex, balance and control. The sword is responsive, quick, resilient yet flexible. The sword has a sharply tapered cut and thrust blade. When in hand, the sensation, is that of an extension of ones arm. Although minimalist, the crusader sword is of stunning complexity. The Crusader sword is made from 5160 High Carbon steel. Peened pommel and mild steel fittings. The wood handle is wrapped in high quality distressed cognac brown leather and stitched at the side.