F.A.Q

Are your prices in Canadian or American currency ?

A: All of our prices are in American (U.S.) currency.

What steels are your swords made from ?

A: Right now, we make our regular swords from 5160 High Carbon Steel and Dual hardened at a Rockwell of 60 at the edge and 50 at the core. Our Elite series is made from a blend of 1095, 5160, L-6 and O1 steel pattern-welded into a single billet.

Should I use vinegar to clean my sword blade ?

A: You shouldn’t be using vinegar to clean the blade. We recommend using Autosol to polish the blade or remove rust. The link is below. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=67014&cat=1,43415,43439,67014 You can also use other products such as Silvo or Brasso (both sold at Walmart for under 5$). We also recommend reading our maintenance instructions posted on our blog. The link is below. https://darksword-armory.com/a-guideline-for-the-proper-maintenance-of-your-sword-collection/

If your swords has any black residue due to buffing compound, you can use Acetone. This will remove all blemishes, spots or dirt from your blade. Make sure not to put any acetone on the leather handles or scabbards. Latex gloves should be used with Acetone and done in a well vented area.

What are your guards and pommels made from ?

A: Depending on the model, our guards and pommels are made from mild steel, antiqued bronze, or polished brass.

Do your swords have full tangs ?

A: All of our swords are fully functional swords with full tangs.

Are your swords peened ?

A: We use a combination of threading and peening to secure the hilt to each of our swords – this allows us to minimize any loosening caused by contraction of the wood in the handle from temperature changes during shipping. The exception is our WMA practice line, which uses hex nuts for easy maintenance and repair.

Do you offer a warranty on your swords?

A: We offer a full one-year warranty for all of our swords. If your sword suffers from any kind of manufacturing defect or breaks in any way, we will repair or replace it at our cost.

I’d like to see where your swords are made. Do you offer tours ?

A: We do indeed offer tours of our shop. We do request at least 24 hours notice that you are coming, however.

what is the difference between your Elite Series and Standard Series swords?

A: There are considerable differences between Damascus (pattern welded) steel and 5160 or 10XX series High Carbon Steel.

First, it is important to understand that Pattern welded (AKA Damascus Steel) swords are not more durable than properly made 5160 high carbon steel blades. The structural integrity of both our series (Standard 5160 High Carbon Steel and the Elite Series Damascus Steel series swords) are equally resistant and can take equal stress.

The difference is really the manufacturing techniques, material used and the amount of labour involved in making the swords, especially in regards to the pattern welded guards and pommels. Whereas the standard series are made of 5160 High Carbon Steel and dual hardened, the Elite series is forged with a blend of 1095, 5160, L6 and 01 tool steel. These are then placed in a billet and folded repeatedly to produce the stunning pattern. This is really where the extra labour is accounted for.

The Elite Series is really for the collector looking for a centre piece to his/her collection.

Do you ship internationally ?

A: Yes, we ship internationally and to APO addresses (military boxes). Our usual shipping fee for outside of North America is $160 for single-handed swords, and $180 for two handed swords. We can put up to three Medieval swords into one box without raising the shipping price. In order for us to get the shipping cost from our cargo agent, we will require your full address. If you email it to us along with the model number, we could get a quote within 2 business hours.

Do you make custom swords ?

A: Unfortunately, we no longer accept custom pieces.

I don’t like the colour of the sword handle or scabbard – can I get it in another colour (such as red, green, etc.) ?

A: Unfortunately, most of the time the answer is “no.” However, we can usually accommodate requests for leather in brown or black. But this does depend on how busy we are at the time of the order.

I like a sword but I want a hilt/guard/handle from a different one – can you swap it out for me ?

A: As mentioned above, we don’t do custom orders any longer. However, we do offer leftover sword fittings from our production runs for sale, with all proceeds going to the Animal Rescue Network, a no-kill animal shelter in Montreal. If you want to purchase one of sword fittings sets in addition to your sword, we would be happy to swap the hilt around for you before we ship it out.

Are you blades Razor sharp ?

In regards to the edge of the sword, it should be noted that medieval swords were not made with a razor edge. This is not only due to the blade geometry, but also due to the fact that the purpose of a European sword is not to cut through armor but rather break (slash) armor and pierce (thrust) an opponent. Katanas on the other hand are very different. The edge of a katana is razor sharp as its purpose is to cut through (leather) armor and bone. The thickness and edge geometry however is very different to European weapons. As such, a medieval sword cannot and was not sharpened with a razor edge as katanas.

For further details I would suggest reading the following article by renown author and reenactment combat teacher Hugh Knight:

http://talhoffer.blogspot.ca/2011/05/how-sharp-were-medieval-swords.html

I also suggest reading the i33 combat manual for insight into the use and therefore sharpness of the medieval sword:  http://www.aemma.org/onlineResources/restricted/i33/i33text.pdf

Finally, I would suggest watching the following documentary with John Clements. It explains the different between edge sharpeness of the medieval sword as opposed to the katana

For further reading on edge analysis we have also written an article on our blog. You can read it at the following link:

How sharp were medieval Swords ?

European swords cut extremely well despite not having razor sharp edges. The cutting ability however is created by the angle of the cut, speed and motion (slicing). All three combined will create a momentum in which the sword will cut through cutting targets quite easily.

 

Can your swords be used for combat ?

Sword to sword (historical) combat yes, but not stage combat. There is a very big difference. The WMA swords in the reenactment section are made for stage combat, which usually involves edge to edge contact for dramatic effect. These swords are made with rounded off edges and the blades are made 2 mm thick. This however is not the proper way of using a standard (real) sword. This goes for Darksword Armory blades as well as the blades by any historical sword manufacturer. Unfortunately there are huge misconceptions about the proper use of swords. There are still many self proclaimed “experts” who do not understand these differences (theatrical vs. historical combat) and who believe that all swords should be able to withstand edge to edge contact and should be able to cut through shields and logs. Few, if any self proclaimed “experts” really understand the reason why wood cutting tools such as axes are made of iron, not steel. A sword will never be able to cut through a shield or logs without structural damage. Wood is capable to absorbing shock that steel is simply not capable of doing. Hence the reason wood cutting axes are made of iron, not steel. Same goes for shields. The vikings were brilliant military tacticians and fighters. They understood that swords were unable to cut or break through well made shields. When blows from opponents were swung, Vikings used their shields to block the blow, making the sword stick in the wood core of the shield. Once stuck, they would swing the shield 180 degree downwards and snap the sword in two.  Hope this clarifies some of the issues.

Do you have a layaway or instalment program ?

We do now offer payment plans. Simply choose the payment option when choosing your Sword. The Cart will charge 25% of the sword and will also include any applicable taxes and shipping costs up front. To make payments going forward, you can send us payments via PayPal by choosing “Send Money”, then choosing “Pay for Goods or Services” Our PayPal Email Address ID is [email protected] You can then enter the amount (Typically you can just dived the balance in the amount of payments you would like to pay and use that amount). In the note section, please include the invoice number so we have a reference to use to apply your payment. Alternatively, you can call us with a credit card number to make your payments as we do not store credit card information.  Once your initial payment is registered, your Sword purchase will be kept on reserve for you. The Sword will only be shipped upon balance completion. We cannot reserve items for longer then 6 months however. If you have any questions regarding the payment plan, please do not hesitate to contact us. Thank you,