Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Evolution of the Medieval Gauntlet

The expression ‘throwing down the gauntlet’ stems from the middle ages and is literally a call to arms. One look at the medieval gauntlet, often featuring knuckledusters design to maximize punishment when resorting to punches, and it’s easy to understand how the gauntlet became a symbolic call to arms. Early metal plate hand protection began during the late 12th […]

An examination of a pair of 15th Century German Gauntlets

Recently, Eyal Azerad, the owner of Darksword Armory, took a first-hand examination of an authentic pair of 16th century German Gauntlets. The Gauntlets are dated from 1580-1590’s. Made of Iron. Rolled and roped edge cuffs, five slightly tapered and embossed metacarpal plates and shaped knuckle plates. Finely etched with continuous floral design on the central […]

The Evolution Of the Medieval Sword In the 13th – 15th Centuries

The Evolution Of the Medieval Sword In the 13th – 15th Centuries Sword design in the late medieval period evolved in direct response to rapid growth of the armor of the late medieval era. Hence, the understanding as to how, and why, medieval swords evolved as they did, is intertwined with an understanding of the changes in armor production […]

An Introduction to Damascus Steel Sword Making

One of the most fascinating aspects of modern day sword making, particularly in regards to medieval swords, is without question, Damascus steel.  Time after time, collectors have asked us about the properties and the beautiful patterns for which Damascus steel is so well known for. Inevitably, as a collector, one is bound to be fascinated […]

The Roman Gladiators : A life of Servitude and Violence

Gladiators, originating from the Latin word “gladius” or sword, stemmed from professional and amateur fighters in ancient Rome who fought for the entertainement of “civilized” spectators. Gladiators were trained in special schools called ludi which could be found as commonly as ampitheatres throughout the empire. There were four schools in Rome itself, the largest of […]